Eighteenth National Conference Morning Breakout Group Topics: 4-15-07

Eighteenth National Conference on Primary Health Care Access
Breakfast Breakout Groups
Sunday, April 15, 2007
GROUP ONE: Primary Care Physician Lifestyles
Many medical students and medical school applicants assume that it is impossible to survive as a primary care physician, and that they must choose a procedural specialty to be able to get a return on the investment in their medical education.  Your group is tasked with the responsibility to develop succinct and persuasive arguments to counter this assumption.  Choose a member of the group to record the arguments that the group would use.
LeRoy, Group Leader; Babitz, Clancy, Cobb, Hara and L. Burnett
GROUP TWO: Primary Care Physician Lifestyles
Many medical students and medical school applicants assume that it is impossible to survive as a primary care physician, and that they must choose a procedural specialty to be able to get a return on the investment in their medical education.  Your group is tasked with the responsibility to develop succinct and persuasive arguments to counter this assumption.  Choose a member of the group to record the arguments that the group would use.
Boltri, Group Leader, W. Burnett, Cambanis, Curry, Flinders and Roberts
GROUP THREE: Primary Care Physician Lifestyles
Many medical students and medical school applicants assume that it is impossible to survive as a primary care physician, and that they must choose a procedural specialty to be able to get a return on the investment in their medical education.  Your group is tasked with the responsibility to develop succinct and persuasive arguments to counter this assumption.  Choose a member of the group to record the arguments that the group would use.
Zweifler, Group Leader, Ganiats, Henley, Jafri, Kahn and North
GROUP FOUR: How to Meld the Traditional Professional Standards of Medicine with the Current Practice Environment.
Do physicians in the first decade of the 21st century have radically different ideas about “the professional standards of medicine” than those of physicians 100 years earlier? Are there professional values that transcend the current practice environment?  Suppose a major journal asks your group to propose the outline of an editorial on what be regarded as contemporary medicine’s core values, written from a long-term perspective.  What would that outline say?
Geyman, Group Leader, Catinella, DeHaven, Dine’ Chacon and Zollinger
GROUP FIVE: How to Meld the Traditional Professional Standards of Medicine with the Current Practice Environment.
Do physicians in the first decade of the 21st century have radically different ideas about “the professional standards of medicine” than those of physicians 100 years earlier? Are there professional values that transcend the current practice environment?  Suppose a major journal asks your group to propose the outline of an editorial on what be regarded as contemporary medicine’s core values, written from a long-term perspective.  What would that outline say?
Rodos, Group Leader; Atkinson, Freeman, Kasovac and McCanne
GROUP SIX: Meeting the Needs of the Underserved: the “Grey’s Anatomy” Way
At present, the most popular source of information on the health care system may be ABC’s hit show “Grey’s Anatomy” about the lives of surgical interns and residents at a teaching hospital in Seattle.  One of the recurring story lines is about a surgical resident, who, desiring to address the needs of Seattle’s needy, forces the hospital to create a free clinic and then harangues the hospital’s surgeons and interns to volunteer time between surgeries as primary care physicians.
In your capacity as family physician educators, critique the story line, and provide the outline of a written response to this particular story line, as how the needs of the medically underserved should be addressed that would make sense to medical students and applicants.
Troy , Group Leader, Macken, Maudlin, McConarty, Morioka-Douglas and Olsen
GROUP SEVEN: Meeting the Needs of the Underserved: the “Grey’s Anatomy” Way
At present, the most popular source of information on the health care system may be ABC’s hit show “Grey’s Anatomy” about the lives of surgical interns and residents at a teaching hospital in Seattle.  One of the recurring story lines is about a surgical resident, who, desiring to address the needs of Seattle’s needy, forces the hospital to create a free clinic and then harangues the hospital’s surgeons and interns to volunteer time between surgeries as primary care physicians.
In your capacity as family physician educators, critique the story line, and provide the outline of a written response to this particular story line, as how the needs of the medically underserved should be addressed that would make sense to medical students and applicants.
Fowkes , Group Leader, Newton, Ross, Serpas, Smith and Tindall
GROUP EIGHT: Meeting the Needs of the Underserved: the “Grey’s Anatomy” Way
At present, the most popular source of information on the health care system may be ABC’s hit show “Grey’s Anatomy” about the lives of surgical interns and residents at a teaching hospital in Seattle.  One of the recurring story lines is about a surgical resident, who, desiring to address the needs of Seattle’s needy, forces the hospital to create a free clinic and then harangues the hospital’s surgeons and interns to volunteer time between surgeries as primary care physicians.
In your capacity as family physician educators, critique the story line, and provide the outline of a written response to this particular story line, as how the needs of the medically underserved should be addressed that would make sense to medical students and applicants.
McKennett , Group Leader, Clasen, Christman, Shore and Susman
Eighteenth National Conference on Primary Health Care Access
Breakfast Breakout Groups
Monday, April 16, 2007
GROUP FIVE: How to Meld the Traditional Professional Standards of Medicine with the Current Practice Environment.
Do physicians in the first decade of the 21st century have radically different ideas about “the professional standards of medicine” than those of physicians at the 100 years earlier? Are there professional values that transcend the current practice environment?  If so, how can one assure that such values are predominant?
Clasen, Group Leader, Henley, Jafri, Nocella, Priester and Tindall
GROUP SIX: How to Meld the Traditional Professional Standards of Medicine with the Current Practice Environment.
Do physicians in the first decade of the 21st century have radically different ideas about “the professional standards of medicine” than those of physicians 100 years earlier? Are there professional values that transcend the current practice environment?  Suppose a major journal asks your group to propose the outline of an editorial on what be regarded as contemporary medicine’s core values, written from a long-term perspective.  What would that outline say?
?
Fowkes, Group Leader, Hahn, LeRoy, North, Osborn, Patsch and Spaulding

Eighteenth National Conference on Primary Health Care Access

Morning Breakout Groups

Sunday, April 15, 2007


GROUP ONE: Primary Care Physician Lifestyles

Many medical students and medical school applicants assume that it is impossible to survive as a primary care physician, and that they must choose a procedural specialty to be able to get a return on the investment in their medical education.  Your group is tasked with the responsibility to develop succinct and persuasive arguments to counter this assumption.  Choose a member of the group to record the arguments that the group would use.

LeRoy, Group Leader; Babitz, Clancy, Cobb, Hara and L. Burnett

GROUP TWO: Primary Care Physician Lifestyles

Many medical students and medical school applicants assume that it is impossible to survive as a primary care physician, and that they must choose a procedural specialty to be able to get a return on the investment in their medical education.  Your group is tasked with the responsibility to develop succinct and persuasive arguments to counter this assumption.  Choose a member of the group to record the arguments that the group would use.

Boltri, Group Leader, W. Burnett, Cambanis, Curry, Flinders and Roberts

GROUP THREE: Primary Care Physician Lifestyles

Many medical students and medical school applicants assume that it is impossible to survive as a primary care physician, and that they must choose a procedural specialty to be able to get a return on the investment in their medical education.  Your group is tasked with the responsibility to develop succinct and persuasive arguments to counter this assumption.  Choose a member of the group to record the arguments that the group would use.

Zweifler, Group Leader, Ganiats, Henley, Jafri, Kahn and North

GROUP FOUR: How to Meld the Traditional Professional Standards of Medicine with the Current Practice Environment.

Do physicians in the first decade of the 21st century have radically different ideas about “the professional standards of medicine” than those of physicians 100 years earlier? Are there professional values that transcend the current practice environment?  Suppose a major journal asks your group to propose the outline of an editorial on what be regarded as contemporary medicine’s core values, written from a long-term perspective.  What would that outline say?

Geyman, Group Leader, Catinella, DeHaven, Dine’ Chacon and Zollinger

GROUP FIVE: How to Meld the Traditional Professional Standards of Medicine with the Current Practice Environment.

Do physicians in the first decade of the 21st century have radically different ideas about “the professional standards of medicine” than those of physicians 100 years earlier? Are there professional values that transcend the current practice environment?  Suppose a major journal asks your group to propose the outline of an editorial on what be regarded as contemporary medicine’s core values, written from a long-term perspective.  What would that outline say?

Rodos, Group Leader; Atkinson, Freeman, Kasovac and McCanne

GROUP SIX: Meeting the Needs of the Underserved: the “Grey’s Anatomy” Way

At present, the most popular source of information on the health care system may be ABC’s hit show “Grey’s Anatomy” about the lives of surgical interns and residents at a teaching hospital in Seattle.  One of the recurring story lines is about a surgical resident, who, desiring to address the needs of Seattle’s needy, forces the hospital to create a free clinic and then harangues the hospital’s surgeons and interns to volunteer time between surgeries as primary care physicians.

In your capacity as family physician educators, critique the story line, and provide the outline of a written response to this particular story line, as how the needs of the medically underserved should be addressed that would make sense to medical students and applicants.

Troy , Group Leader, Macken, Maudlin, McConarty, Morioka-Douglas and Olsen

GROUP SEVEN: Meeting the Needs of the Underserved: the “Grey’s Anatomy” Way

At present, the most popular source of information on the health care system may be ABC’s hit show “Grey’s Anatomy” about the lives of surgical interns and residents at a teaching hospital in Seattle.  One of the recurring story lines is about a surgical resident, who, desiring to address the needs of Seattle’s needy, forces the hospital to create a free clinic and then harangues the hospital’s surgeons and interns to volunteer time between surgeries as primary care physicians.

In your capacity as family physician educators, critique the story line, and provide the outline of a written response to this particular story line, as how the needs of the medically underserved should be addressed that would make sense to medical students and applicants.

Fowkes , Group Leader, Newton, Ross, Serpas, Smith and Tindall

GROUP EIGHT: Meeting the Needs of the Underserved: the “Grey’s Anatomy” Way

At present, the most popular source of information on the health care system may be ABC’s hit show “Grey’s Anatomy” about the lives of surgical interns and residents at a teaching hospital in Seattle.  One of the recurring story lines is about a surgical resident, who, desiring to address the needs of Seattle’s needy, forces the hospital to create a free clinic and then harangues the hospital’s surgeons and interns to volunteer time between surgeries as primary care physicians.

In your capacity as family physician educators, critique the story line, and provide the outline of a written response to this particular story line, as how the needs of the medically underserved should be addressed that would make sense to medical students and applicants.

McKennett , Group Leader, Clasen, Christman, Shore and Susman